Phrozen Windows Programming - Papers

Description

This Delphi unit demonstrate how to manipulate EOF Data of a Valid Microsoft Windows Portable Executable (PE) File.

EOF (End Of File) is often used by Malware authors to offer their Malware users a way to edit Malware payload configuration (Ex: C2 informations) without having access to source code.

You often encounter such techniques in:

  • Remote Access Tool/Trojan (RAT)
  • File Wrapper / Binder
  • Downloader
  • Loader / Botnets
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Tiny snippet to know whether or not target process id is running under 32bit or 64bit architecture.

If result is True, target process is running under 64bit architecture.

If result is False, target process is running under 32bit architecture.

// ...

uses Windows, SysUtils;

// ...
type
  TArchitecture = (x86, x64, xUnknown);
// ...

function IsProcessX64(AProcessId : Cardinal) : TArchitecture;
var AProcHandle   : THandle;
    AWow64Process : bool;
begin
  result := xUnknown;
  ///

  {
    If we are not in a 64Bit system then we are for sure in a 32Bit system
  }
  if (TOSVersion.Architecture = arIntelX86) then
    Exit();
  ///

  AProcHandle := OpenProcess(PROCESS_QUERY_LIMITED_INFORMATION, False, AProcessId);
  if AProcHandle = 0 then
    Exit;
  try
    isWow64Process(AProcHandle, AWow64Process);
    ///

    if AWow64Process then
      result := x86
    else
      result := x64;
  finally
    CloseHandle(AProcHandle);
  end;
end;
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This is one of the most famous method to enumerate running process on Windows.

If AFilterSameArch is set to True, only processes running with same architecture as current process will be listed.

{
    Jean-Pierre LESUEUR (@DarkCoderSc)

    Example:

    ...
    var AProcessName    : String;
        AProcessId      : Cardinal;
        AProcessList    : TDictionary<Integer, String>;
    begin
        AProcessList := EnumProcess(True);
        try
            for AProcessId in AProcessList.Keys do begin
                if NOT AProcessList.TryGetValue(AProcessId, AProcessName) then
                    continue;
                ///

                ...
            end;
        finally
            if Assigned(AProcessList) then
            FreeAndNil(AProcessList);
        end;
    end;
}

//...
uses tlhelp32, SysUtils, Windows, Generics.Collections;
//...

function EnumProcess(AFilterSameArch : Boolean = False) : TDictionary<Integer {Process Id}, String {Process Name}>;
var ASnap         : THandle;
    AProcessEntry : TProcessEntry32;
    AProcessName  : String;

    procedure AppendEntry();
    begin
      if AFilterSameArch and ((IsProcessX64(GetCurrentProcessId())) <> (IsProcessX64(AProcessEntry.th32ProcessID))) then
        Exit();
      ///

      result.Add(AProcessEntry.th32ProcessID, AProcessEntry.szExeFile);
    end;

begin
  result := TDictionary<Integer, String>.Create();
  ///

  ASnap := CreateToolHelp32Snapshot(TH32CS_SNAPPROCESS, 0);
  if ASnap = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE then
    Exit();
  try
    ZeroMemory(@AProcessEntry, SizeOf(TProcessEntry32));
    ///

    AProcessEntry.dwSize := SizeOf(TProcessEntry32);

    if NOT Process32First(ASnap, AProcessEntry) then
      Exit();

    AppendEntry();

    while True do begin
      ZeroMemory(@AProcessEntry, SizeOf(TProcessEntry32));
      ///

      AProcessEntry.dwSize := SizeOf(TProcessEntry32);

      if NOT Process32Next(ASnap, AProcessEntry) then
        break;

      AppendEntry();
    end;
  finally
    CloseHandle(ASnap);
  end;
end;
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You will find below 4 different techniques to close/kill/terminate Windows process in pure WinAPI.

Techniques

  • TerminateProcess() : Classic method.
  • ExitProcess() : via Code Injection (32bit to 32bit ; 64bit to 64bit).
  • Crash Process : Inject code that will crash the process (32bit to 32bit ; 64bit to 64bit).
  • CTRL_CLOSE_EVENT / WM_CLOSE : Send "close" messages to target process windows.

TerminateAProcess() Method

Kill target process id following desired method : tmpAll, tpmTerminateProcess, tpmExitProcess, tpmCrash, tpmMessage

tmpAll attempt to kill process from cleanest way to dirtiest way until it succeed.

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You will find below an example of how to enumerate process modules using the well known Windows API CreateToolHelp32Snapshot(), I will cover additional methods soon.

You may notice that when using CreateToolHelp32Snapshot(), first result (row) is generally the Image Path of the process owning module. I ignore that row by checking the value of szExePath with owner process image path.

GetProcessName() is compatible since Windows Vista. It is possible to support Windows XP and below but not in this example.

You will find GetProcessName() and alternatives in separated snippets threads.

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This one possible technique (through QueryFullProcessImageNameW) to get process image path from it id.

This example support Windows Vista to latest Windows version (Actually Windows 10)

I will cover other example progressively and compatible with Windows XP and below.

// Jean-Pierre LESUEUR (@DarkCoderSc)

//...
uses Windows, SysUtils;
//...

function GetProcessName(AProcessID : Cardinal) : String;
var hProc      : THandle;
    ALength    : DWORD;
    hDLL       : THandle;

    QueryFullProcessImageNameW : function(
                                            AProcess: THANDLE;
                                            AFlags: DWORD;
                                            AFileName: PWideChar;
                                            var ASize: DWORD): BOOL; stdcall;

const PROCESS_QUERY_LIMITED_INFORMATION = $00001000;
begin
  result := '';
  ///

  if (TOSVersion.Major < 6) then  
    Exit();
  ///

  QueryFullProcessImageNameW := nil;

  hDLL := LoadLibrary('kernel32.dll');
  if hDLL = 0 then
    Exit();  
  try
    @QueryFullProcessImageNameW := GetProcAddress(hDLL, 'QueryFullProcessImageNameW');
    ///

    if Assigned(QueryFullProcessImageNameW) then begin
      hProc := OpenProcess(PROCESS_QUERY_LIMITED_INFORMATION, false, AProcessID);
      if hProc = 0 then exit;
      try
        ALength := (MAX_PATH * 2);

        SetLength(result, ALength);

        if NOT QueryFullProcessImageNameW(hProc, 0, @result[1], ALength) then 
          Exit();

        SetLength(result, ALength); // Get rid of extra junk
      finally
        CloseHandle(hProc);
      end;
    end;
  finally
    FreeLibrary(hDLL);
  end;
end;
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This unit demonstrate how to enumerate DLL exported functions through PE Header manipulation.

Features

  • Support both 32 and 64bit DLL's.
  • Identify exported function names.
  • Identify exported function ordinal value.
  • Support and resolve forwarded function.
  • Identify export function address and relative address.
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In the past two days, I released examples about how to enumerate DLL export table through the PE Header.

We will see one concreate example of using the UntEnumDLLExport.pas library to dynamically load API without using the famous Windows API > GetProcAddress()

This technique is quite known and often used by some Malware, to mask which API's they are dynamically loading and avoid Antivirus detection.

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This very small snippet is an adaptation of the previously released unit > UntEnumDLLExport.pas with just one goal, retrieve an exported function address by its name from any DLL (both 32 and 64bit).

This adaptation is also interesting because it remove the need of having both heavy units Generics.Collections and SysUtils to have a smaller binary.

Finally it is also quite interesting for tweaking our GetProcAddress alternative (you will find here) and only have the necesarry code.

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As promised, we will adapt our previous code grab an exported function directly from memory.

Serious advantage of this technique:

  • We don't have to use CreateToolHelp32Snapshot anymore to enumerate modules and catch target module base address.
  • We don't need to parse PE Header from disk anymore, we will parse PE Header directly from memory.

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